Major Taylor

 1878 - to - 1932

The National Brotherhood of Cyclists was formed in 2008. The organization was inspired by the principals set forth by Marshall "Major" Taylor, a pioneer in American cycling

More About Major Taylor

 

 

 

National Brotherhood of Cyclists Programs

National Brotherhood of Cyclists "Youth Program Support"

The National Brotherhood of Cyclists owes its success to the active clubs who volunteer to assist in the association functions as well as other activities and projects that help us realize our mission and goals.

Providing support to youth cycling programs is viewed as one way our association can give back to the community. Through our support of young cyclists, the NBC feels that these young people will inpire others in the community to start cycling and become more actively involved with furthering the association's mission statement.

National Brotherhood of Cyclists "Youth Education"

Online Course, Teacher's Carriculum Guide and Read-a-thon  that teaches youth about the 1899 world cycling champion and trailblazing black athlete Marshall W. "Major" Taylor, and the values he championed.

  • Fair play
  • Sportsmanship
  • Clean living
  • Importance of a good education

 
National Brotherhood of Cyclists "Health Education"

What are health fairs? Health fairs are held in various locations around the country throughout the year in order to promote health awareness, provide free or low cost health screenings and information about health problems, and encourage participants to assume responsibility for their own health.

What is the NBC’s  involvement? The primary purpose of the NBC is to create a network of people and resources that promote an appreciation of cycling and its health and fitness benefits, particularly targeting those communities disproportionately affected by health issues.

Setting up an NBC booth at a health fair can be a great way to educate people on the benefits of cycling. and "attract" people who may want to get involved with local cycling clubs.

While the NBC  does not host, finance, or otherwise endorse any particular health fair, we will be providing exhibits, displays, Posters, Pamphlets  and other information for members to participate in their local health fairs.

The dates and locations of health fairs are usually coordinated amongst active NBC members. 

Why are we involved? The NBC understands that cycling can play a part in preventive health by focusing on positive actions like exercise and diet. These actions can have a significant impact on health issues effecting our comunity.

  1. African American males are 60% more likely to die from a stroke than their White adult counterparts.
  2. African American women have the highest rates of being overweight or obese compared to other groups in the U.S. About four out of five African American women are overweight or obese.
  3. African American adults are twice as likely than non-Hispanic white adults to have been diagnosed with diabetes by a physician.
  4. 2005, African Americans were 2.2 times as likely as non-Hispanic Whites to die from diabetes.
  5. 2005, African American men were 30% more likely to die from heart disease, as compared to non-Hispanic white men.
  6. African Americans are 1.5 times as likely as non-Hispanic whites to have high blood pressure.
  7. 2005, African American men were 1.3 times as likely to have new cases of lung and prostate cancer, compared to non-Hispanic white men.
  8. African American men are twice as likely to have new cases of stomach cancer as non-Hispanic white men.
  9. African Americans men have lower 5-year cancer survival rates for lung and pancreatic cancer, compared to non-Hispanic white men.
  10. 2005, African American men were 2.4 times as likely to die from prostate cancer, as compared to non-Hispanic white men.
  11. 2005, African American women were 10% less likely to have been diagnosed with breast cancer, however, they were 34% more likely to die from breast cancer, compared to non-Hispanic white women.
  12. African American women are twice as likely to be diagnosed with stomach cancer, and they were 2.4 times as likely to die from stomach cancer, compared to non-Hispanic white women.
  13. African American adults are 1.7 times as likely than their White adult counterparts to have a stroke.

Statistics from the Office of Minority Health

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NBCOFFICE

The NAME and LOGO of (THENBC) NATIONAL BROTHERHOOD OF CYCLISTS are the property of the National Brotherhood of Cyclists. As such, any use of the name and/or logo by any organization must be authorized in writiing by the Board of Directors in advance of such use.